The 5 Stages of Tooth Development

The 5 Stages of Tooth Development

The 5 Stages of Tooth Development

The 5 Stages of Tooth Development

Tooth decay in children has been on the rise in the United States, making the case for educating parents on the processes of tooth development such an important health matter. Tooth decay has also been linked to heart disease, affecting 1 out of every 4 people, and is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. In looking more closely at tooth development, we will first start by looking at tooth development stages, to better assess what is actually happening to establish the foundations of our teeth.

Tooth Development

Tooth Development

The histological stages of tooth development first stage is called the Initiation stage, and involves differences between the dental lamina and vestibular lamina. This occurs when the dental lamina connects the tooth bud to the epithelial layer of the mouth.
The second histological stages of tooth development is the Bud stage. In this stage, the tooth bud can be observed. The epithelial cells multiply very quickly into the ectomesenchyme of the jaw. This can be seen when a fetus is six weeks old.
The third histological stages of tooth development is the Cap stage. In this stage, one might see the beginning of cells assembling in the tooth bud. A few ectomesenchymal cells stop producing extracellular substances, which creates an accumulation of these cells called the dental papilla. The tooth grows around this accumulation, and takes on the appearance of a cap, which becomes the enamel organ protecting the dental papilla.
The 5 Stages of Tooth Development

The 5 Stages of Tooth Development

The fourth stage of histological tooth development is the Bell stage. During this stage, the dental organ is the shape of a bell, and most of its cells are called “stellate reticulum”, due to their star-like appearance. In the Early Bell Stage, cells near the enamel organ separate into four important layers: the Outer Enamel Epithelium (OEE), the Inner Enamel Epithelium (IEE), stratum intermedium, and the cervical loop. Later in the Bell stage, the dental lamina disintegrates, leaving the growing teeth completely separate from the epithelium of the oral cavity.
Tooth Development

Tooth Development

The fifth stage of histological development is the Advanced Bell stage. In this stage, hard tissues like enamel and dentin develop, and it is sometimes called the “crown” or “maturation stage” by dental professionals. Cells stop dividing during the crown stage, where the tips of the teeth form. The IEE cells change from cuboidal to columnar form, and become preameoblasts. The nuclei of these cells move closer to the stratum intermedium and away from the dental papilla as they become separated. Another layer of cells located near the dental papilla may grow in size, and change into odontoblasts, which aid in the formation of dentin. The odontoblasts secrete a substance, called “the organic matrix” (or “predentin”), which contains material needed for dentin formation. Dentin begins to form in the outside of the tooth, progressing inwards towards the dental papilla. This process of formation is what gives dentin its tubular microscopic appearance.
In assessing each of these extensive tooth development stages, probably the best way to nourish your child in order to encourage the growth of strong, healthy teeth would be to have a diet enriched with lots of vitamin C, coenzyme Q10, calcium, and magnesium. A regular teeth brushing and flossing is also recommended, so establishing this as a twice a day regimen (or as recommended by your dentist), is crucial to continued dental health.
None found.
Be Sociable, Share!

Comments are closed.

You might also likeclose